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The failure rate of composite restorations is double that of amalgam (Ferracane, 2013). Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm, experience more sec- ondary decay, and require more frequent replacement. In vivo biodegradation of the adhesive bond at the composite- tooth interface is a major contributor to the cascade of events leading to restoration failure.The failure rate of composite restorations is double that of amalgam (Ferracane, 2013). Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm, experience more sec- ondary decay, and require more frequent replacement. In vivo biodegradation of the adhesive bond at the composite- tooth interface is a major contributor to the cascade of events leading to restoration failure.The failure rate of composite restorations is double that of amalgam (Ferracane, 2013). Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm, experience more sec- ondary decay, and require more frequent replacement. In vivo biodegradation of the adhesive bond at the composite- tooth interface is a major contributor to the cascade of events leading to restoration failure.

The failure rate of composite restorations is double that of amalgam (Ferracane, 2013). Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm, experience more sec- ondary decay, and require more frequent replacement. In vivo biodegradation of the adhesive bond at the composite- tooth interface is a major contributor to the cascade of events leading to restoration failure.

 

 

Proteins, Pathogens, and Failure at the Composite-Tooth Interface

P. Spencer, Q. Ye, A. Misra, S.E.P. Goncalves, and J.S. Laurence

Abstract

In the United States, composites accounted for nearly 70% of the 173.2 million composite and amalgam restorations placed in 2006 (Kingman et al., 2012), and it is likely that the use of composite will continue to increase as dentists phase out dental amalgam. This trend is not, however, with-out consequences. The failure rate of composite restorations is double that of amalgam (Ferracane, 2013). Composite restorations accumulate more biofilm, experience more sec-ondary decay, and require more frequent replacement. In vivo biodegradation of the adhesive bond at the composite-tooth interface is a major contributor to the cascade of events leading to restoration failure. Binding by proteins, particularly gp340, from the salivary pellicle leads to bio-film attachment, which accelerates degradation of the inter-facial bond and demineralization of the tooth by recruiting the pioneer bacterium Streptococcus mutans to the surface. Bacterial production of lactic acid lowers the pH of the oral microenvironment, erodes hydroxyapatite in enamel and dentin, and promotes hydrolysis of the adhesive. Secreted esterases further hydrolyze the adhesive polymer, exposing the soft underlying collagenous dentinal matrix and allow-ing further infiltration by the pathogenic biofilm. Manifold approaches are being pursued to increase the longevity of composite dental restorations based on the major contribut-ing factors responsible for degradation. The key material and biological components and the interactions involved in the destructive processes, including recent advances in understanding the structural and molecular basis of biofilm recruitment, are described in this review. Innovative strate-gies to mitigate these pathogenic effects and slow deteriora-tion are discussed.

 

KEY WORDS: dentin bonding agents, methacrylate, gp340, Streptococcus mutans, esterases, biofilm.

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World Conference on Glass Ionomer Cements

2015 Towards Biomimetic Dentistry

 

It is a great pleasure to extend an invitation to participate in the World Conference on Glass Ionomer Cements to be held in London, UK from 10th-12th September 2015 at Moore Complex, Royal Holloway University, Royal Holloway University of London (Near Heathrow Airport).

This conference brings together the most knowledgeable researchers from all over the world, to highlight recent developments in Glass Ionomer Cements particularly in the areas of Atraumatic Restorative Dentistry and Biomimetic Dentistry.

Along with Keynote lectures from some of the world’s leading experts in GIC, This conference consists of lectures/seminars, clinical demos, poster sessions on recent research related to the topic.

Conference Themes/Topics

• Atraumatic Restorative Therapy

• Biomineralising Cements

• Biomimetic Dentistry

• Advances in GIC Chemistry

• Light Cured GICs

• Medical Applications

 

For further details and abstract submission and conference booking please visit www.glassionomer.com or

http://www.dentistry.qmul.ac.uk/Conferences/World%20Conference%20on%20Glass%20Ionomer%20Cements/148319.html

If you require any further information please contact Dr Saroash Shahid on s.shahid@qmul.ac.uk  or +44 207 882 5983

 

 Biomimetic Dentistry

 

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After preparation using a partial matrix system filled with Glass with no monomers! set with Thermo-cure. Courtesy: Han Heesen

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Biomimetic Dentistry is a new way of dentistry which takes advantages of the natural mineralization processes in the mouth without using harmfully products.

Decay is a unbalance of re- and demineralisation leading to a loss of minerals like Calcium and Phosphates. Biomimetic Dentistry aims to reverse this unbalance by offering the lost minerals back to the tooth. Hand excavation (ART protocol) is preferred to keep as much as tissue which
IMG_2352can be re-minerelised. (see also video’s) Glass Ionomers can be used to deliver the desired minerals. Glass Ionomers are with normal auto cure are too weak to survive all the forces in a loaded multi surface posterior filling. With the help of Thermo-cure the properties can be boosted to get a permanent restoration which can compete with the strength of a sound tooth. Also minerals in a past or as a sealant can prevent ongoing decay. When the majority of the tooth is lost Bioactive porcelains can be bonded with a natural mineralization process without any margins. (see mineralization in vivo!)